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almond orchard landscape News Article

California’s Almond Acreage Grows More Than a Healthy Nut

Acreage Report Newsroom Statement California’s Almond Acreage Grows More Than a Healthy Nut Today, the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service issued its official report on California’s almond acreage, showing an increase in 2016. Bearing acres, that is orchards old enough to produce a crop, were reported at 940,000 acres, up 2 percent from 2015. Total almond acres for 2016 were estimated at 1.24 million acres, up 7 percent from 1.16 million acres the previous year. And with each new orchard and every added tree, the benefits of this agricultural forest continue to grow. Almond orchards are generally planted with 116 trees per acre2, each acre growing 450 pounds of protein, 260 pounds of fiber, and “good” monounsaturated fats. ,  Beyond growing 80 percent of the world’s supply of heart healthy, nutrient dense almonds  in a climate ideally suited to them, California’s almond trees and the land they grow on provide four key benefits to their surrounding communities and environment including enhancing health, creating jobs, adding value, and strengthening pollinators. “California’s almond orchards provide the first natural food source for honey bees each year and benefit air quality by capturing and storing carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas,” said Almond Board of California President and CEO, Richard Waycott. “Furthermore, the California Almond community creates jobs in a region known for high unemployment, boosts the economy and recycles almond coproducts like hulls and shells to address needs across several industries, including feed and bedding for livestock, with new uses being explored in food, automotive, pharmaceutical and plastics.”     [1] USDA-NASS. 2016 California Almond Acreage Report. Apr. 2017. [2] USDA-NASS. 2016 California Almond Objective Measurement Report. Jul. 2016. [3] USDA-ARS, NDL. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28. Version Current: September 2015, slightly revised May 2016. [4] USDA-NASS. 2015 Almond Acreage Report. Apr. 2016. [5] Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, such as almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. One serving of almonds (28g) has 13 grams of unsaturated fat and only 1 gram of saturated fat.  

// About the Almond Industry
minimize food waste News Article

In honor of International Earth Day, California Almonds & New York Times best-selling author create flavorful, adaptable recipes to minimize food waste

  MODESTO, Calif. (April 20, 2017) – It’s no secret that food waste is a global problem. Roughly one third of the food produced in the world gets lost or wasted every year, and in the United States alone, 40% of our food is wasted.[1] Perhaps even more alarming, the amount of food waste globally each year is more than enough to feed millions of hungry people in the world.[2] Although these statistics are unpleasant, there are simple ways we can be more conscientious to reduce food waste in our everyday lives. To provide some ideas on concrete steps to take, California Almonds has teamed up with Lisa Leake of 100 Days of Real Food to create flavorful, out-of-the-box recipes made from ingredients that are commonly discarded, along with simple tips to reduce food waste.   “Adopting a more sustainable lifestyle and creating new recipes that reduce food waste doesn’t mean sacrificing taste or convenience,” Lisa says. “With simple everyday lifestyle changes such as embracing imperfect produce and using multi-purpose ingredients, we all can do a bit to be more conscious.”   Almonds are a shelf-stable, multi-purpose ingredient that can be chopped, diced, ground to make into butter, flour and almond milk. And many people don’t know that almond trees provide several products, not just the nuts we eat. Almond hulls, the protective outer layer covering the nut, are sold as livestock feed, and almond shells aren’t commonly packaged for consumers to discard, but are used as livestock bedding. Even the trees’ wood, after its 25-year lifecycle, can be chipped and recycled into the soil or used for other purposes. As with other trees, almond trees trap carbon, a greenhouse gas. ­­ Lisa’s recipe collection at www.Almonds.com/Consumers/Sustainable-Living features delectable snacks, side dishes and meals that deliciously use a variety of flavorful ingredients, some of which are commonly unused or discarded. Lisa’s mash of almond milk and parsnips, a root vegetable many are unaware how to use, can be a great side dish. If curious what to do with vegetable greens, her roasted beet greens salad with sliced almonds, olive oil and goat cheese can be a great surprise. And her carrot top almond pesto is perfect for a spring or summer party platter.   Lisa shares additional quick tips to minimize food waste at Almonds.com/Sustainable-Living. Ideas include: Make it a game. Put the ingredients you have on a table and challenge family members to get creative by transforming them into a meal using only what you already have in your kitchen. Prepare yourself for each grocery store visit. It sounds simple, but many people don’t do it. By simply making a list with your weekly meal plan in mind, you can not only reduce food waste but also save money and time.   About Lisa Leake Lisa Leake is a wife, mother, foodie, blogger and author of the New York Times best seller, “100 Days of Real Food.” She began chronicling her family’s journey on 100 Days of Real Food when in 2010 they decided to start seeking out the real food in our processed food world. What started as a simple pledge has turned into a valuable and practical resource that’s now read by millions around the globe. Follow Lisa on her website, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.   About California Almonds Almonds from California are a healthy, natural, wholesome and quality food. The Almond Board of California promotes almonds through its research-based approach to all aspects of marketing, farming and production on behalf of the more than 6,500 almond growers and processors in California, many of whom are multi-generational family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, the Almond Board of California is a non-profit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit Almonds.com or check out California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and the California Almonds blog.   # # #     [1] United States Department of Agriculture (n.d.). Retrieved April 18, 2017, from https://www.usda.gov/oce/foodwaste/sources.htm [2] Key facts on food loss and waste you should know! (n.d.). Retrieved April 17, 2017, from http://www.fao.org/save-food/resources/keyfindings/en/  

// Nutrition & Wellness
Leadership Class News Article

Next Generation of Leaders Gets Yearlong Almond Immersion

Almond Board of California (ABC) has unveiled its 2017 Almond Leadership Program class, a group of 18 future leaders representing nearly every aspect of the industry: growers, processors, suppliers, retailers and pest control advisers.   Participants will spend the next year in a structured program, with the oversight of volunteer mentors, preparing them to become leaders not just within the California Almond industry, but also in their communities.   The class will complete specialized training in a wide variety of topic areas, such as food safety, biomass utilization, honey extraction and nutrition research. Over the course of the year, they will spend time in nurseries, almond orchards, a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) research facility, and other venues where they will get hands-on experience and training.   Along the way, the participants will build relationships and develop communications skills; gain a clear understanding of current social, political, scientific and economic issues facing the almond industry, as well as how to effect change; and learn how all sectors along the almond supply chain work together to provide a safe, sustainable1 product. At the end of the year, each participant will have to present their findings from a yearlong self-directed project designed to advance industry knowledge in an area of interest to them. In the past, some of these projects have led to important breakthroughs for the industry. ABC is currently conducting follow-up research on the promising initial project of one of last year’s Almond leaders around an alternative use of almond hulls and shells. “We are so fortunate to have this program,” said Kent Stenderup, a member of the ABC Board of Directors and also a volunteer mentor for this year’s Almond Leadership Program. “As an industry, we get to interact with the best and brightest individuals who will lead us in the decades to come. This program grounds these participants in the latest industry knowledge, but also teaches them how to be leaders, and to understand the responsibilities that come with that.” This year’s class has also pledged to raise $25,000 for California Future Farmers of America (FFA) scholarships. Over the past eight years, the program has graduated more than 100 participants. Daniel Bays of Westley is one of those alumni. The third-generation grower was in the program in 2013. “I loved going through the Almond Leadership Program,” he said. “It was invaluable for me. Even as someone who grew up in the industry, I had a lot to learn. The attention to the curriculum, as well as the emphasis on leadership and the responsibility we have to give back to our communities, are what I took from the program.” Members of this year’s class include: Lucas Avila, Farmland Management Services; Annie Benisch, Stewart & Jasper; Christina Brichetto, Terra Nova Trading Inc.; Brennon Christopher, Semios; Devin Clarke, Stanislaus Farm Supply; Kevin Esau, Arysta LifeScience; Luke Heuer, Heuer Farms; Ashley Hollis, Almond Alliance of California; Robert Holtermann, Holtermann Farms; Marcus McClure, Gar Tootelian, Inc.; Chris Parreira, RPAC; Michelle Penney, Del Rio Nut Company; Sharon Rucker, Law Office of Sharon E. Rucker, PC; Bret Sill, Sill Properties Inc.; Bikramjit Singh, Bapu Almonds Co., Inc.; Katelynn Staack, Grizzly Nut; Ryan Sunzeri, Sunworks; and Cameron White, Sierra View Ranch. The Almond Leadership Program is sponsored by Sunworks, Inc. for 2017. 1 Sustainable almond farming utilizes production practices that are economically viable and are based upon scientific research, common sense and a respect for the environment, neighbors and employees. The result is a plentiful, nutritious, safe food product.    

// About the Almond Board
almond bloom News Article

Almond Board of California Addresses Impact of Fungicide Iprodione on Honey Bee Health in Honey Bee Best Management Practices

The Almond Board of California values peer-reviewed research that brings forth new information to help the almond industry better understand honey bees and how farmers can support their health, including the new study about the effects of almond protection fungicides on honey bee forager survival conducted at the Department of Entomology at Texas A&M University. The study indicates that the fungicide iprodione, an important pest management tool for almond growers during bloom, may impact adult foraging honey bees. However, there is an important element missing from this conversation: the California Almond community has always worked to ensure almond orchards are a safe place for honey bees and for the past five years has been adapting its practices to avoid the use of fungicides, including iprodione, when bees and pollen are present in orchards. To this end, the Almond Board developed the Honey Bee Best Management Practices (BMPs), a comprehensive guide for farmers and other pollination stakeholders to protect bees during the almond pollination season and beyond. In fact, these guidelines specifically discuss iprodione, reiterating a University of California recommendation to avoid its use during almond bloom due to research showing it can affect young, developing bees. Of course, if iprodione is used, it should be applied following the larger fungicide recommendation from the Honey Bee BMPs – that is applied in the late afternoon or evening when bees and pollen are not present. In the study’s paper published in the Journal for Economic Entomology, the author concludes that “when considering the use of fungicides during the almond bloom, cautious fungicide application in almond orchards is recommended…applying fungicides during times of low honey bee forager activity, such as late evenings, would help mitigate the direct and potential secondary effects of fungicides to honey bee colony health.” The Almond Board agrees and has been communicating this principle to the industry for over five years through the widely distributed and adopted Honey Bee BMPs, which recommend only applying necessary fungicides in the later afternoon or evening when bees and pollen are not present. The California Almond community has invested in more than 100 research projects focused on improving honey bee health since 1995 – funding more than any other crop or commodity group.[1] We will continue to actively engage with beekeepers, researchers and other pollination partners to understand and translate research findings to the field with a focus on bee safety. You can learn more about our commitment to honey bee health in our recent blog post, “Preparing Bees for Almond Bloom” and on the Almonds.com Honey Bee Health page.     [1] Gene Brandi. Vice President, American Beekeeping Federation.

// Almond Bloom and Bees
almond orchard landscape News Article

2017 Board of Directors Election Results

Almond Board of California has released election results for the Board of Directors positions whose terms of office are Mar. 1, 2017, through Feb. 28, 2018. The names of the following nominees have been sent to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture for approval and appointment:   Independent Grower Positions Member Position One (one-year term): Mike Mason, Wasco   Alternate Position One (one-year term): Brad Klump, Escalon   Independent Handler Positions Member Position One (three-year term): Dave Phippen, Manteca   Alternate Position One (three-year term): Ron Fisher, Modesto   Member Position Three (one-year term): Dinesh Bajaj, Chico   Alternate Position Three (one-year term): Micah Zeff, Modesto   Cooperative Grower Positions Member Position (three-year term): George Goshgarian Jr, Fowler   Alternate Position (three-year term): Christine Gemperle, Ceres   Cooperative Handler Positions Member Position (three-year term): Bill Morecraft, Sacramento   Alternate Position (three-year term): Alicia Rockwell, Sacramento       About California Almonds Almonds from California are a natural, wholesome and quality food. The Almond Board of California promotes almonds through its research-based approach to all aspects of marketing, farming and production on behalf of the more than 6,800 almond growers and processors in California, many of whom are multigenerational family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, the Almond Board of California is a non-profit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit Almonds.com or check out California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and the California Almonds blog. For additional facts and statistics about almonds and the almond industry, please read the 2016 Almond Almanac.   ###

// About the Almond Board
almond research News Article

Almond Board of California Commits $4.7 Million to an Innovation-Fueled Future

Today on both National Almond Day and National Innovation Day, Almond Board of California (ABC) is announcing a research commitment that will benefit the almond community in 2017 and beyond. Through this program, ABC is investing $4.7 million dollars in 82 independent, third-party research projects exploring next-generation farming and sustainability practices.[1]   Almond Board-funded research and the improvement opportunities it represents for almond growers is strengthened with grants from the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s (CDFA) 2016 Specialty Crop Block Grant (SCBG) Program and State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program (SWEEP). Altogether, funding covers a range of areas including irrigation efficiency, air quality and honey bee health.   Through ABC, the California almond community has invested $60 million to build a foundation of research on environmental, production and other issues to continually evolve best practices. This effort includes the Accelerated Innovation Management (AIM) program and was celebrated at the recent Almond Conference in a short film.   “This commitment helps ensure that almond farmers and the industry as a whole have the tools to implement sustainable production practices that result in a plentiful, nutritious and safe food product for consumers the world over to enjoy,” said Almond Board Director of Sustainability and Environmental Affairs, Gabriele Ludwig.   Almond Board Research Investment Formally launched in 1973, the Almond Board’s research programs have been providing a scientific basis for best practices across several priority areas for more than 40 years. Two of those key areas are sustainable water use and protecting the honey bees that pollinate the state’s almond crop each year. Since 1982, California almond growers have reduced the amount of water needed to grow a pound of almonds by 33 percent.[2] To further this improvement, 17 of this year’s research projects focus on irrigation improvement with an investment of $1.3 million. To address the major factors impacting honey bee health, 11 new research projects, totaling nearly $400,000 have been funded. In total, $2.3 million has been committed to honey bee health research since 1995, more than any other crop or commodity group.[3]   “By continually investing in research, we challenge ourselves to do more and continue to pave the way for almonds to be an economically, environmentally and social responsible crop for California.” said Almond Board CEO, Richard Waycott. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers install sensors in a Stanislaus County almond orchard to better understand its groundwater recharge potential. A sampling of projects funded by ABC include: University of California Cooperative Extension, Brent Holtz: Whole Orchard Recycling United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Bryan Jenkins: Almond Shells Used to Improve Properties of Plastics University of California, Davis, Helen Dahlke: Winter Water Management Assessing Recharge in Almond Orchards University of California, Davis, Shrini Upadhyaya: A Leaf Monitoring System for Continuous Measurement of Plant Water Status to Assist with Irrigation Management of Specialty Crops Washington State University, Walter Sheppard: Importation and Preservation of Germplasm for U.S. Honey Bee Breeding and Stock Improvement   Specialty Crop Block Grant Program In addition to ABC’s research program, CDFA’s Specialty Crop Block Grant Program has awarded $2.39 million in United States Department of Agriculture research funding to 10 almond-related projects. For many of the projects, this allows ABC’s partner research institutions to supplement current ABC investments or continue projects previously supported by ABC that will benefit the almond industry.   “It is gratifying to see that the industry dollars our committees are putting toward research or to outreach has compelled additional research funding through the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program,” said Ludwig. “Not only does this further advance almond production, it helps improve California agriculture as a whole.”   Select almond-specific grantees include: Almond Board of California: Facilitate FSMA Implementation Through Resource Development and Outreach for Almond Operations Covered Under Farm Definition        University of California, Davis, Brent Holtz and Amélie Gaudin: Potential of Whole Orchard Recycling to Build Sustainability and Resilience of Almond Production               University of California, Davis, Patrick Brown: Data-Driven Block-Level Yield Prediction for Seasonal Nitrogen Fertilization Strategies in California’s Almond Orchards   USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Greg Browne: Development of Versatile Phytophthora-Resistant Almond and Walnut Rootstocks Using Host-Induced Gene Silencing   State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program Through CDFA’s State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program, 528 agricultural projects totaling $55.7 million have been selected to receive funding to invest in irrigation systems and practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save water. The projects leverage an additional matching funds, provided by the award recipients.   The most recent funding award provided more than 16 almond growers means to install cutting-edge irrigation technology, much of which was proven by research through programs like the Almond Board of California’s and the Specialty Crop Block Grant program.   “This investment continues California’s ongoing innovation in agricultural water use efficiency,” said CDFA Secretary, Karen Ross. “Farmers involved in this program are making positive on-farm changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, grow food with the most efficient use of water and help address our changing climate.” Almond grower grantees received funding for irrigation improvements including: Conversion from traditional flood irrigation to water-saving microirrigation systems Soil moisture sensors and in-field weather stations that provide important information for determining when irrigation is needed Sand filters that keep irrigation systems at a constant pressure and flush particles that can cause blockages and inefficiency Flow meters that give growers exact information on how much water is being applied to their field, which is important for managing water resources and system maintenance   Together, these three research programs help to ensure that the California Almond industry continues to identify and implement sustainable and innovative farming practices. Through this research and its supporting partnerships, the California almond community will be prepared to meet the future needs of agriculture, our communities and the environment.     [1] Sustainable almond farming utilizes production practices that are economically viable and are based upon scientific research, common sense and a respect for the environment, neighbors and employees. The result is a plentiful, nutritious and safe food product. [2] University of California. UC Drought Management. Feb. 2010. Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN. FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper 66 – Crop yield in response to water. 2012. Almond Board of California. Almond Almanac 1990-94, 2000-14. [3] Gene Brandi. Vice President, American Beekeeping Federation.  

// Environmental Sustainability, Accelerated Innovation Management
almond day News Article

CELEBRATE ALMOND DAY THE ENTIRE MONTH OF FEBRUARY WITH VERSATILE RECIPES & HEART-SMART TIPS

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist & Food Blogger Marisa Moore Shares “Almonds Five Ways” Recipes and Lifestyle Tips   MODESTO, Calif. – In honor of Almond Day on February 16, California Almonds and Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Marisa Moore are teaming up to offer 20 new, versatile almond snack recipes, along with heart-smart wellness tips for an almond-filled celebration all month long. From almond peach granola and smoked paprika almond popcorn bowls to make-ahead travel snacks such as almond butter banana cookies, America’s favorite nut can be enjoyed and celebrated in all kinds of ways. From February 1-28, check out Almonds.com/CelebrateAlmonds for these craveable, heart-smart almond recipes and tips to give a boost to any snacking routine. Moore, a trusted nutrition and food expert, knows the importance of maintaining proper nutrition and eating quality foods   Almond Day falls on February 16th, and also coincides with American Heart Month and National Snack Food Month, so there are good reasons to celebrate almonds all month long. Almonds and heart health go hand in hand. In fact, scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that eating 1.5 ounces of most nuts, such as almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. One serving of almonds provides six grams of hunger-fighting protein, four grams of filling fiber and 13 grams of good, unsaturated fat.   If that isn’t reason enough to snack on almonds, a newly published meta-analysis found that eating almonds results in significant reductions in total cholesterol, “bad” LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, while having no significant impact on “good” HDL cholesterol levels[1], adding to the weight of evidence that supports the consumption of almonds as part of a healthy diet to maintain healthy blood lipid levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. The analysis included 18 published randomized controlled trials and a total of 837 participants. When data from all of the studies were pooled, the reduction in total cholesterol was 0.153 mmol/L (5.92 mg/dL).  The observed effects were greatest with a daily almond intake of 45 g (approximately 1.5 ounces). The study reflects more than two decades of research demonstrating that including almonds in a healthy diet pattern can help maintain a healthy heart and healthy cholesterol levels. Learn more about this study here.   Moore’s tips include: Crush cravings for something crispy. Use egg white and almond meal to coat and bake chicken or vegetables for a crunchy, toasty crust that’s got fiber and flavor. Sweeten oatmeal and yogurt with fruit like cooked apples or pears, berries, and bananas. Learn to love tea without sugar by adding fresh lemon or mint for a little extra zest. Sprinkle a dash of cinnamon or unsweetened cocoa in your coffee for flavor without excess sugar.   From February 1-28, 2017, California Almonds’ social media followers are encouraged to share how they use almonds in their favorite recipes or daily routine by using #CelebrateAlmonds. Follow California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and visit Almonds.com/CelebrateAlmonds for more information, tips and recipes.   About Marisa Moore Marisa is a trusted food and nutrition expert and registered dietitian nutritionist appearing regularly in national media outlets. Marisa has over ten years of experience working with clients to improve health outcomes in overall wellness, weight management, diabetes, high cholesterol, blood pressure and heart disease. Before launching her consultancy full-time, Marisa managed the nutrition worksite wellness program for the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC). A former spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Marisa has been featured in over 1,000 interviews in national print, TV and radio media outlets. She is a past President of the Georgia Dietetic Association (GDA) and is an active member of the Robinson College Council of Business Young Leaders. Marisa holds a Bachelor of Science degree in nutrition and dietetics from Georgia State University and an MBA (Marketing) from that university’s Robinson College of Business. For recipes and wellness tips visit her website marisamoore.com, or visit her on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. About California Almonds Almonds from California are a healthy, natural, wholesome and quality food. The Almond Board of California promotes almonds through its research-based approach to all aspects of marketing, farming and production on behalf of the more than 6,500 almond growers and processors in California, many of whom are multi-generational family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, the Almond Board of California is a non-profit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit Almonds.com or check out California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and the California Almonds blog.   # # #   [1] Musa-Veloso K, Paulionis L, Poon T, Lee HL. The effects of almond consumption on fasting blood lipid levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.  Journal of Nutritional Science 2016; 5(e34):1-15. 

// Lifestyle
almonds News Article

Almond Board Election Underway

For Immediate Release                    Jan. 27, 2017   For More Information: Sue Olson (209) 343-3224 solson@almondboard.com   Almond Board Election Underway Voting begins Jan. 28   (Modesto, Calif., Jan. 27)—Voting will begin Jan. 28 to select one independent grower member and alternate position and two independent handler member and alternate positions for the Almond Board of California (ABC) Board of Directors. Members in these positions will serve as directors with terms beginning on March 1, 2017.   Candidates for the independent grower position are:   Position One, Member (One-year term):                          Position One, Alternate: Mike Mason, Wasco (incumbent)                                    Brad Klump, Escalon (incumbent)                                                                         Candidates for the independent handler positions are:   Position One, Member (Three-year term):                        Position One, Alternate: Dave Phippen, Manteca (incumbent)                              Ron Fisher, Modesto (incumbent)   Position Three, Member (One-year term):                        Position Three, Alternate: Dinesh Bajaj, Chico (petitioner)                                      Micah Zeff, Modesto (petitioner)                                                                                                            Jeremy Basich, Bakersfield (petitioner)                             Ballots and instructions have been mailed to all independent growers whose names are on file with ABC.  The Almond Board must receive ballots by Feb. 15, 2017, in order to be counted. If an independent grower does not receive a ballot, one may be obtained by contacting Sue Olson at (209) 343-3224.   As a governing body for the industry, the ABC Board of Directors is comprised of five handler and five grower representatives who set policy and recommend budgets in several major areas including production research, public relations and advertising, nutrition research, statistical reporting, quality control and food safety.   About California Almonds Almonds from California are a natural, wholesome and quality food. The Almond Board of California promotes almonds through its research-based approach to all aspects of marketing, farming and production on behalf of the more than 6,800 almond growers and processors in California, many of whom are multi-generational family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, the Almond Board of California is a non-profit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit Almonds.com or check out California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and the California Almonds blog. For additional facts and statistics about almonds and the almond industry, please read the 2016 Almond Almanac.   ###

// About the Almond Board
Jen Widerstrom News Article

California Almonds teams up with fitness trainer Jen Widerstrom to crunch the 2:58 PM Crash

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   Contact:                                                                       Marissa Girolamo                                                                      Becky Sereno 310-754-4123                                                                             209-343-3250  marissa.girolamo@porternovelli.com                                          bsereno@almondboard.com     california almonds teamS up with fitness trainer jen widerstrom TO CRUNCH THE 2:58 Pm Crash Enter the “Crunch the Crash” Contest at almonds.com/crunchthecrashcontest to Seize the Afternoon   MODESTO, Calif. (January 6, 2017) – The mid-afternoon energy crash is a common and real phenomenon. A recent nationwide study[1] conducted by GfK’s KnowledgePanel® shows that more than half of Americans experience an afternoon crash at least once a week. To outsmart the afternoon crash, California Almonds has teamed up with Jen Widerstrom, America’s positive, big-hearted and highly motivational trainer on NBC's hit series, "The Biggest Loser,” to help consumers seize the afternoon, or “Carpe PM!”, with almonds.    Americans report feeling drowsy, less productive and worn out during an afternoon crash. However, according to Jen, smart snacking and quick desk workouts can make a major difference. Together, California Almonds and Jen are providing a source of inspiration to reset and recharge when energy levels start to waver. Check out their stories, memes, handy tips and other ideas at http://carpepm.almonds.com/.   “Research tells us that 2:58 p.m. is the average time that people across the nation experience an energy crash,” Jen says. “And when you hit it, you’re at a crossroads, and you have a decision to make: Am I going to let it get to me, or am I going to overcome it and make the most of my day? I'm here to teach people how their afternoon crash is as avoidable as a pothole in the middle of the road. I have a ton of ideas for snacking smart and getting your blood flowing again, so you can seize your afternoon – or carpe PM!   Why almonds? As Jen says, “Almonds are SO my go-to snack. They have a perfect combination of energizing protein, filling fiber and good fat, so they’re great to tide me over until dinner without making me tired or too full.”     For a chance to work with Jen in person, enter the California Almonds “Crunch the Crash” contest. It’s an opportunity to spend an active, inspirational and fun afternoon with one of America’s favorite trainers. Jen will travel to one lucky winner’s office or gym to share workout routines and snacking tips that will help power through an afternoon crash.  In addition, the lucky winner will receive a year’s supply of almonds and gear to help #CarpePM.   Get more tips and tricks to beat the afternoon crash and Carpe PM with Jen at http://carpepm.almonds.com. To enter the “Crunch the Crash” contest and for official rules and regulations visit almonds.com/crunchthecrashofficialrules.   About Jen Widerstrom At the forefront of the health and fitness community, Jen Widerstrom is widely known for her role as America’s big-hearted trainer and emotional backbone on NBC's hit series, "The Biggest Loser.” Widerstrom has quickly become a person of impact, and no one is out of her reach when it comes to her connecting with her audience. By looking at the weight loss journey from the inside out, Jen’s approach isn’t as simple as a basic diet and exercise plan.  Jen’s methodology stands upon honoring the individual and through applying her self-experienced tools of success, people thrive and small victories are transformed into huge accomplishments. Work ethic, authenticity and sincere devotion to living in service of others enables her to be considered an irreplaceable extension of family to those she trains. To learn more about Widerstrom, visit teamjennifer.com, or visit her on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.   About California Almonds Almonds from California are a healthy, natural, wholesome and quality food. The Almond Board of California promotes almonds with a research-based approach to responsible farming, production and marketing on behalf of the more than 6,500 almond growers and processors in California, many of whom have third- and fourth-generation family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, the Almond Board of California is a non-profit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit Almonds.com or check out California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and the California Almonds blog.   # # # [1] Conducted online for the Almond Board of California using GfK’s KnowledgePanel®, September 19 - October 3, 2016. The total sample size is 6,490 adults aged 18+ years. 

// Lifestyle
almonds News Article

Sustainability and Production Research, Global Marketing Initiatives to Move Forward as USDA Implements Assessment Increase

For Immediate Release December 22, 2016   For More Information: Carissa Sauer                                      209.343.3284                                       csauer@almondboard.com                Sustainability and Production Research, Global Marketing Initiatives to Move Forward as USDA Implements Assessment Increase   (Modesto, Calif., Dec. 22, 2016) — On Dec. 20 the USDA published the Final Rule to implement the recommendation by Almond Board of California (ABC) to increase the assessment from 3 cents per pound to 4 cents per pound for a three-year period beginning with the current 2016–17 almond crop. The decision means ABC can move forward with aggressive plans to broaden its sustainability1 and production research and launch new global marketing programs.   The increase is limited to three years because it is expected that almond production will increase significantly during that time, after which the assessment rate will return to the 3-cents-per-pound rate.   “The idea is to give us a shot in the arm with some additional funding,” said Richard Waycott, President and CEO of ABC. “We need to invest now by keeping demand ahead of supply.”   There are three principal reasons why ABC determined that an assessment increase was needed:   1.     25% increase in production anticipated by 2020. This estimated 500-million-pound increase needs to be addressed now in order to invest in increasing global demand prior to the production hitting the market. This will require doing more of what has been working to market California Almonds, as well as implementing new, innovative marketing programs. 2.     Strain on agricultural resources has never been higher. Almonds are currently California’s highest-value agricultural crop, and soon they will be its largest acreage crop, putting the industry in a leadership role. With this leadership comes responsibility. Additional investment will allow ABC to take a leadership role by investing in and accelerating research that will address concerns such as: (a) our changing water supply, (b) air quality issues, as they relate to harvesting and pesticide and energy use; and (c) bee health, which is critical to the almond industry’s success. 3.     Transformation of the consumer landscape. The environment in which we are growing and marketing almonds is quickly changing. Consumers are more interested in where and how their food is grown and processed. In response, the almond industry needs to take a leading role in the world of sustainable farming, as we have done for so long in the world of human nutrition, through transparent communications promoting our meaningful and measured improvements in sustainability.   To plan for and address these challenges, ABC’s Board of Directors has worked across the Environmental, Production Research, Almond Quality and Food Safety, Technical and Regulatory Affairs, and Global Market Development Committees to develop a plan of action. This plan includes investment in research through the Accelerated Innovation Management (AIM) program and global marketing.     Building on Sustainability1 The AIM program is designed to expand and accelerate sustainability and production research in nine areas:   1.     Irrigation and nutrients 2.     Orchard, tree and rootstock 3.     Harvesting 4.     Almond biomass, co-products, energy 5.     Soil health management 6.     Pest management 7.     Food safety leadership 8.     Pollination 9.     Sustainability   The global marketing effort expands our programs to address production growth and changing consumer needs by:   ·         Accelerating programs and their results in current markets; ·         Considering additional markets for development; ·         Increasing communication transparency and trust; and ·         Ensuring confidence in our sustainability efforts.   Members of ABC’s Board of Directors are available to discuss the assessment increase, especially as it relates to supporting the AIM program and global marketing efforts. Send an email to staff@almondboard.com or call the ABC office at (209) 549-8262.   1.     Sustainable almond farming utilizes production practices that are economically viable and are based upon scientific research, common sense and a respect for the environment, neighbors and employees. The result is a plentiful, nutritious and safe food product.   ###   About Almond Board of California Almonds from California are a natural, wholesome and quality food. Almond Board of California promotes almonds through its research-based approach to all aspects of marketing, farming and production on behalf of the more than 6,800 almond growers and processors in California, many of whom are multigenerational family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, Almond Board of California is a nonprofit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on Almond Board of California or almonds, visit Almonds.com or AlmondSustainability.org. Be sure to check out California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and the California Almonds blog.

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