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Almonds reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease for adults with type 2 diabetes
Almond Board |

A recent research from Harvard University, funded by the US National Institutes of Health, shows that eating tree nuts, such as almonds, may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease for adults with type 2 diabetes. Specific findings of the study attributed that people with diabetes who ate at least five servings of nuts per week had a 17 percent lower risk of total cardiovascular disease incidence compared to those who ate one or less weekly servings. They also had a 20 percent lower risk of coronary heart disease, a 34 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease death and a 31 percent reduced risk of death from all causes.
The study included 16,217 men and women who either had type 2 diabetes at the beginning of the study or who were diagnosed during the time of the study. A serving in the study was defined as one ounce or 28 gm of nuts. The research also said that compared to those who did not change their nut-eating habits after their diabetes diagnosis to those who did begin to eat more nuts had an 11 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular disease, a 15 per cent lower risk of coronary heart disease, a 25 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular disease death and a 27 per cent lower risk of all-cause premature death. Whether they did or didn’t eat nuts prior to their diabetes diagnosis, adding even a small amount of nuts offered a beneficial effect. An additional serving of nuts each week was associated with a 3 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease and a 6 percent lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease. The overall findings of the study held true even when gender, body weight and smoking factors were considered.

Commenting on this study nutritionist Ritika Samaddar says, “A study in the past shows that if you have type 2 diabetes, eating almonds as part of a healthy diet may help improve glycemic and cardiovascular measures and lead to better health. It has also been found that the daily consumption of a handful of almonds, as part of an overall healthy diet, reduces the risk of heart disease. In addition to significantly improving LDL cholesterol, snacking on almonds also reduced central adiposity (belly fat) and waist circumference. Central adipocytes contribute to major causes of death, including heart attacks, high blood pressure, diabetes, and depression.”

Previous research supports the positive role of nuts in heart health. And, having diabetes has long been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular issues. The researchers added that the beneficial effects of nuts can be at least partially explained by their unique nutritional composition, including unsaturated fatty acids, fiber, vitamins (such as vitamin E and folate), minerals (such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium), and phytochemicals (such as flavonoids and phytosterols.

A similar study led by Dr Seema Gulati, PhD demonstrated recently that eating almonds as part of a healthy diet helps improve glycemic and cardiovascular measures and leads to better health in Indians with Type 2 diabetes. The participants of this study were residents of Delhi and the findings from the study were published in the journal Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders and funded by the Almond Board of California.

About the Almond Board of California

Almond Board of California in India
India has a rich and long standing tradition of almond consumption. The Almond Board of California celebrates this tradition and looks at the county as a market of great potential and importance. This is a reason for the board to continue to invest resources to run and support an active marketing, trade and market access programme in the country.

By the means of this programme, the board aims to build awareness around the multiple nutritional benefits of consuming almonds every day post validating them through learnings obtained from various nutrition researches.

To achieve this and as a part of the India programme, Almond Board of California engages with consumers, health care professionals, importers , food companies, government and regulatory agencies within the country.

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