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As Rains Soak California, Farmers Test How To Store Water Underground
Almond Board |

Helen Dahlke, a groundwater hydrologist at the University of California, Davis, is working with a half-dozen farmers who are ready to flood their fields this year. "We have test sites set up on almonds, pistachios and alfalfa, just to test how those crops tolerate water that we put on in the winter," she says. There are two big reasons for these experiments. The first is simply that California's aquifers are depleted. It got really bad during the recent drought, when farmers couldn't get much water from the state's surface reservoirs. They pumped so much groundwater that many wells ran dry. The water table in some areas dropped by 10, 20, or even 100 feet. Aquifers are especially depleted in the southern part of California's Central Valley, south of Fresno. Flooding fields could help the aquifers recover. The second reason to put water underground is climate change.

About the Almond Board of California

Almonds from California are a healthy, natural, wholesome and quality food. The Almond Board of California promotes almonds with a research-based approach to responsible farming, production and marketing on behalf of the more than 7,600 almond growers and processors in California, many of whom have third- and fourth-generation family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, the Almond Board of California is a non-profit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit Almonds.com or check out California Almonds on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and the California Almonds blog.

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